International

Latest WikiVOIS entries tackle information on Alzheimer’s

Latest WikiVOIS entries tackle information on Alzheimer’s

It’s a difficult subject – and one we’re often asked for information on so we’re pleased to have been able to have uploaded the latest findings regarding Alzheimer’s research onto the WikiVOIS database. There's little research surrounding Alzheimer's and it's a tough area to value. It’s therefore really important that WikiVOIS has begun collating information in this area which we hope will be expanded further.

In an experiment involving 126 Alzheimer patients and their caregivers living in Zurich between 2000-2002 entitled 'Mutual Altruism: Evidence from Alzheimer Patients and Their Spouse Caregivers', from the University of Bayreuth; researchers were hoping participants would indicate what percentage of their household wealth they would be willing to part with to stabilise the condition; cure the condition; and not present a burden for caregivers. The objective was to find out whether the rankings of WTP (Willingness To Pay) values obtained conform to full mutual altruism, in the sense that the patient adopts the preferences of the caregiver and vice versa.

We’ve taken key information from this study and created valuations within WikiVOIS which can be seen here. It’s important to remember that WikiVOIS is not a closed tool but an open platform that allows for both editing and discussion. Have you worked in healthcare research? Do you find the information useful? These entries are there to be commented on and we really hope this can start some meaningful conversations.

The SROI Network joins TEEB for Business

The SROI Network joins TEEB for Business

The SROI Network is proud to announce they have joined The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for Business Coalition a global, multi stakeholder open source platform for supporting the development of methods for natural and social capital valuation in business.

Find out more about the Coalition here

Mapping outcomes for social investment

Mapping outcomes for social investment

Big Society Capital commissioned a team comprising NPC, The SROI Network and Investing for Good to develop a new suite of tools to help social investors, and those seeking social investment, to embed a robust approach to impact in their work.

The tools presented here are:

  • An outcomes matrix, which segments outcomes within the social welfare and environment arenas into 13 outcome areas.
  • Outcomes maps, which drill into the detail of the outcomes matrix, providing overviews of the key outcomes, indicators and data sources commonly used in each of the 13 areas.
  • Guidance on investor best practice is also available here.

The outcomes matrix and outcomes maps are not intended to be exhaustive—rather they represent a first attempt to map the territory in each area. They are also not meant to be prescriptive, but rather to support social investors and potential investees in thinking through the structure of their impact approach.

  1. Housing and essential needs
  2. Education and learning
  3. Employment and training
  4. Physical health
  5. Substance use and addiction
  6. Mental health
  7. Personal and social well-being
  8. Politics, influence and participation
  9. Finance and legal matters
  10. Arts and culture
  11. Crime and public safety
  12. Local area and getting around
  13. Conservation of the natural environment and climate change

You can also access and comment on this content in wikiVOIS, a database containing all the outcomes and indicators covered here, as well as others uploaded by users.

We aim for these outcomes maps to be living documents, which will be revised based on further research and feedback in future. Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your feedback and suggestions.


Corporate social investment is good for all

Corporate social investment is good for all

I WANT to share something about Shell's business that is an integral part of what we do in Australia.

What is generally well known about Shell's business is that we invest in potential. For example, we invest in the possibilities of a gas field, in new technologies such as floating LNG facilities and in the leadership aspirations of our employees.

What may be less known about Shell in Australia is that we are an investor in a range of community organisations and their education projects across the nation. While Shell has contributed to the community throughout its 110 years of business in Australia, last year saw us significantly increase our social investment to $15 million over three years so that we can better align with our growing business aspirations here.

What value can a corporate get out of this social investment? Is it simply spin and PR? Or have we moved to the point where companies like Shell genuinely believe that part of the role of an investor is to invest directly into the community in which we live and work?

Read the entire news item here

from Ann Pickard From: The Australian

Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

IASB had been working on revision to IAS 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets which addresses liabilities of uncertain timing or amounts that are not within the scope of another standard. The exposure draft was published in 2005. In 2012 this became a research project which will focus on identifying examples that are continuing to cause difficulty in practice and it will initially provide test cases for developing the Conceptual Framework.
This is one place where research on materiality in sustainability could meet research on contingency liability in accounting

http://www.ifrs.org/Current-Projects/IASB-Projects/Liabilities/Documents/IFRSLiabilitiesWorkingDraftFeb10.pdf